NAMA Weighs In

To facilitate the transformations we seek, we often have to communicate with policy makers. Although sometimes we go solo, our goal is to join others who share our vision for the future of our oceans. Here are a collection of letters that lay out positions taken by NAMA and/or our projects on various issues from fisheries to persistent pollutants to climate change.

From time to time, we'll also upload supporting documents here that are not necessarily NAMA's.

NAMA joins conservation, fishing, and consumer organizations to comment on the recent Food and Drug Administration's Draft Guidance on Regulating Genetically Engineered (GE) Animals. The guidance outlines how the FDA plans to use its authority under the New Animal Drug Provisions of the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) to oversee GE animals, including GE or transgenic fish. Already, species of transgenic fish are being developed around the world; there is at least one pending before FDA for approval, a GE Atlantic salmon designed to grow as much as 10 to 30 times faster than normal salmon. The groups ask the FDA to reject any applications for transgenic fish because of the foreseeable potential negative impacts to human health, the environment, and fishing communities.
NAMA joins over 100 organizations protesting policies that qualify incinerators—including mass-burn, gasification, pyrolysis, plasma, refuse derived fuel and other incinerator technologies—for renewable energy credits, tax credits, subsidies and other incentives present a renewed threat to environmental and economic justice in U.S. communities.
NAMA comments on the Marine Stewardship Council's certification of the Gulf of California, Mexico sardine fishery. The MSC may certify feed-grade fisheries as part of a larger initiative “to ensure the sustainability of these wild-capture fish used for feed stocks in aquaculture.” The sardine fishery is the first feed-grade fishery to undergo a full assessment for this purpose. However, we argue that the sustainability of the sardine fishery and other reduction fisheries cannot be meaningfully assessed using MSC’s current evaluation system, which was created without consideration for the need to sustain the vital ecological role of the target species as forage - a need worldwide. In summary, NAMA strongly opposes the certification of this fishery.
NAMA unites with over 100 conservation organizations, fishing groups, consumer organizations, seafood businesses, independent scientists, and other concerned parties in requesting that the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council reject the Aquaculture Fishery Management Plan which is slated for Final Action at their January 2009 Council meeting in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. While the Council, its Joint Management Committee, and the Interdisciplinary Planning Team (IPT) have worked diligently over the last year on this plan, it is still fundamentally flawed in its approach.
The Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance is pleased that there are candidates for New England Fisheries Management Council appointment that share out values and who are the kind of individuals that we want to see in that position.
NAMA joins 72 other organizations to express our deep concern over the Bush administration’s departing gift to the chemical industry on October 15th, 2008 -- the formation of yet another review of the EPA’s health assessment study on dioxins, one of the most toxic chemicals on earth. The organizations request that the EPA cancels the unnecessary review and release the Dioxin Reassessment so that the EPA and others can move forward in developing protective dioxin policies and standards.
NAMA joins over 70 organizations in expressing our deep concern over the Bush administration’s departing gift to the chemical industry on October 15th, 2008 -- the formation of yet another review of the EPA’s health assessment study on dioxins, one of the most toxic chemicals on earth. The groups request that President-Elect Obama direct the EPA to cancel the unnecessary review and release the Dioxin Reassessment so that the EPA and others can move forward in developing protective dioxin policies and standards.

Public health, labor, environmental health and justice organizations unite in requesting Congress's assistance to hold oversight hearings and/or initiate a Government Accountability Office (GAO) investigation with the goal of amending the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) and related legislation to improve protections from and remedies for work-related chemical-induced illnesses. The letter was prompted by concerns that the cleanup workers for the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) are suffering from long-term health problems resulting from chemical exposures and that the lack of adequate OSHA and National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) standards and oversight have contributed to these devastating outcomes.

NAMA asks for progressive, visionary fishermen to represent Maine on the New England Fishery Management Council.
New England fishing organizations ask President Obama for leadership that supports local small-scale fishermen who want to turn the decline of fisheries around. Community-based fishermen in New England propose a strong stewardship ethic; a focus on high-quality and low-volume local markets; and, an ecologically sound management strategies that acknowledge distinct ecologically defined areas, integrate all species within those areas and are adaptable to real time changes.